Connotation Examples - Definition & Types | Examples

 

examples of connotation in literature

Examples of Connotation in Literature. In literature, connotation is often used to set the mood of the piece. Here are some examples of this: In James Hurst’s “The Scarlet Ibis,” connation is used in order to set the mood in the introduction. It is also used to foreshadow the events to come in the story. Connotation Examples in Literature. Literature is rich with connotations; here are some examples: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.”. Connotation Examples. Since connotation simply refers to the additional, sometimes hidden meaning of a word, examples of it are essentially infinite. The examples included here come from poetry, fiction, advertising, and painting to illustrate a few different ways connotation can be used to evoke specific ideas or emotions in the reader or viewer.


Denotation - Examples and Definition of Denotation


We understand this sentence by its denotative meaning—it describes the literal color of the fruit. In contrast, read the next sentence:.

If we understand this second sentence by its denotative meaning, examples of connotation in literature, it would mean that Susie is literally the color blue. However, we understand this sentence by its connotative meaning, which is that Susie is sad.

In another example, imagine a drawing with two trees—in one tree is a cat, and at the bottom of the other tree is a dog barking. The caption reads: You are barking up the wrong examples of connotation in literature, Buddy! However, examples of connotation in literature, without the picture, examples of connotation in literature, we would understand this phrase by its connotative meaning, which is to mistakenly pursue the wrong thing.

If we only wrote using denotative meaning, all writing would be dull, colorless, and very straightforward.

Philosophical works rely on the denotative meaning of words and phrases when defining principles, ethics, or moral law. When a philosopher presents a philosophy or principle, he asserts it in terms of what he knows or has decided to be true—he makes statements rather than suggestions. Aristotle describes contemplation in terms of what he believes is its literal function in the human mind. He also explains that of all human activity, contemplation is the one we are capable of doing continuously.

He does not use words that suggest that these are merely ideas, but rather, he uses words and phrasing that directly state what contemplation is. When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. In celebrated work Moby DickHerman Melville relies examples of connotation in literature both denotative and connotative meanings of the words he chooses to describe the elusive and legendary giant white sperm whale named Moby Dick.

This can be seen in the selection below:. What the white whale was to Ahab, has been hinted; what, at times, he was to me, as yet remains unsaid. Aside from those more obvious considerations touching Moby Dick…It was the whiteness of the whale that above all things appalled me. In the above passage, Ishmael begins by referencing the white whale, and in the following sentence calls him Moby Dick. Cooking shows rely on clear instructions, properly measured amounts, and specific ingredients for the success of their recipes, because the audience needs these things to be able to recreate the recipes at home.

The following is a basic pizza recipe from the bestselling Food Network Magazine :. Step 1: Place a pizza stone or an inverted baking sheet on the lowest oven rack and preheat to degrees. Step 2: Stretch 1 pound dough on a floured pizza peel, large wooden cutting board or parchment paper. Step 3: Top as desired, then slide the pizza with the parchment paper, if using onto the stone or baking sheet. Bake until golden, about 15 minutes.

The instructions use clear and specific language to instruct the reader how to make a pizza. The reader expects and relies on the literal meaning of directions to be able to follow it. So, Fletcher can only speak based on the denotative meanings of words. Watch this video on YouTube Since Fletcher cannot lie, everything he says and every word that comes out of his mouth must be literal, truthful, and straightforward—his examples of connotation in literature creative, clever, and untruthful speech cannot be used.

In conclusion, denotation is valuable when you want to be clear and straightforward with the meaning of your words. It is the best way to choose your words when you want to be objective and informative, without creating other feelings or alternate meanings. Examples of connotation in literature of Terms Action. Ad Hominem. Alter Ego. APA Citation. Comic Relief. Deus ex machina. Double Entendre. Dramatic irony, examples of connotation in literature.

Extended Metaphor. Fairy Tale. Figures of Speech. Literary Device. Pathetic Fallacy. Plot Twist. Point of View. Red Herring. Rhetorical Device.

Rhetorical Question. Science Fiction. Self-Fulfilling Prophecy. Turning Point. Urban Legend. Literary Terms.

 

Connotation - Definition and Examples | LitCharts

 

examples of connotation in literature

 

Aug 05,  · Connotation is a part of the study of linguistics called semiotics. Semiotics is the study of the symbols that allow humans to communicate, regardless of language or culture. All words in any language are metaphors, with connotation giving the metaphor a broader meaning. There are numerous examples of connotation in literature. In fact, some would argue that the terms sometimes cross boundaries and serve a dual purpose. For a quick review of the positive and negative effects of certain words, this list of connotation examples will bring you up to speed. Now, let’s explore several examples of connotation in literature. Connotation Examples. Since connotation simply refers to the additional, sometimes hidden meaning of a word, examples of it are essentially infinite. The examples included here come from poetry, fiction, advertising, and painting to illustrate a few different ways connotation can be used to evoke specific ideas or emotions in the reader or viewer.